Uterus1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Uterus News
Feature Story
 Education Center

Conditions
Treatments
Diagnostics

Find a Physician
HTA in the News
 Heavy Periods Center
sharonbober  Uterus
 Hero™

Dr. Sharon Bober:
Healing the Sex Lives of Cancer Patients
About Heroes
 Join the Discussion in  Our Forums
 Community
Uterus1 Forums
Patient Stories
Frequently
    Asked Questions

One Question Poll
    Archive

 Reference
Locate a Specialist
Online Resources
Uterus Anatomy
Video Library
Menstrual Diary
Office Visits
Patient Brochures
  
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
May 26, 2017  
UTERINE NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • preterm

    Breast Milk as Nutrition and Medication for Critically Ill Infants


    September 25, 2014

    Source: Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

    Human milk is infant food, but for sick, hospitalized babies, it's also medicine. That's the central premise of a series of articles in a neonatal nursing journal's special issue focused on human milk for sick newborns. The articles were published during World Breastfeeding Week, Aug. 1-7, 2014.

    Multiple public health and professional medical associations from the World Health Organization to the American Academy of Pediatrics have endorsed the widespread advantages of human milk and breastfeeding for all infants. A new issue of Advances in Neonatal Care is devoted to best practices in providing human milk to hospitalized infants.

    "The immunological and anti-inflammatory properties of human milk are especially important for the critically ill infants in our intensive care units," said Diane L. Spatz, Ph.D., R.N.-B.C., FAAN, nurse researcher and director of the Lactation Program at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), and the invited guest editor of the August 2014 issue of the journal, published by the National Association of Neonatal Nurses.

    An internationally prominent lactation expert, Spatz leads a robust breastfeeding and Lactation Program at CHOP. CHOP is already on the cutting edge of human milk science and lactation services with a state-of-the-art Human Milk Management Center, and round-the-clock support from nurses and international board-certified lactation consultants, as well as wide-spread institutional support. At CHOP, more than four out of five infants discharged from the Hospital's intensive care units are receiving human milk.

    The Hospital has used donor human milk since 2006 for at-risk infants to supplement a mother's own milk supply if it is insufficient or if the mother is unable to provide milk for her infant. This week, CHOP announced plans to launch a non-profit milk bank with the Human Milk Banking Association of North America within a year, an onsite resource not commonly offered within a U.S. children's hospital.

    In the special issue, Spatz and her colleagues from CHOP and other institutions cover a variety of topics on the provision of human milk in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), including original research articles, ethical rationales for the provision of human milk, and evidence-based methods for implementing particular programs.

    • "Characteristics of the NICU Work Environment Associated with Breastfeeding Support," original research led by Sunny G. Hallowell, Ph.D., PPCNP-BC, IBCLC, of the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, analyzes data from a 2008 survey of 6,060 registered nurses in 104 NICUs. This large national sample found that overall, NICU nurses provided breastfeeding support to about 1 in 7 mothers, around the clock. Infants and mothers were more likely to receive this support in units with adequate nurse staffing. Low-birthweight infants were significantly more likely to be discharged on human milk when NICUs were staffed by nurses with B.S.N. degrees.
    • "An Ethical Case for the Provision of Human Milk in the NICU," by Elizabeth B. Froh, Ph.D., R.N., clinical supervisor of CHOP's Lactation Team and the Human Milk Management Center, and Spatz, argues that under the "best interest principle" the infant's best interest, not parental authority, should have priority in guiding infant feeding practices, particularly for critically ill babies in the NICU. The well-documented health benefits of human milk, say the authors, make it the optimal form of nutrition for those infants.
    • "Implementation of a Human Milk Management Center," by Spatz and colleagues describes the CHOP experience in developing its Human Milk Management Center. This centralized facility optimizes the provision of human milk for the most vulnerable infants, allowing staff to analyze human milk, fortifying milk under clean conditions, and making skim milk for infants with conditions requiring it. The authors also discuss logistical considerations, staff training requirements for milk technicians, best safety practices and other organizational processes.

    Additional articles in the issue examine these topics:

    • An integrative review of breast pumping support needed by mothers of NICU infants
    • Congenital hyperinsulinism: exclusive human milk and breastfeeding
    • Implementing a breastfeeding peer support group in a children's hospital
    • Considerations in meeting protein needs of the human milk-fed preterm infant
    • Environmental factors affecting breastfeeding duration within a NICU

    "Supporting the use of human milk is one of the most effective evidence-based strategies to ensure an infant's safe journey through the NICU and promote optimal health and developmental outcomes for these children," added Spatz. "This special edition provides clinicians with tools in order to transform human milk and breastfeeding practices in their own institutions."

    Discuss in the Uterus1 forums

    Photo: Jim Lynch

    Last updated: 25-Sep-14

    Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Uterus1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Allergy Shots During Pregnancy May Decrease Allergies in Children

    Protecting Babies from HIV Infection through Protein in Breast Milk

    Eating More Calories in the Morning, Rather than Evening, Assists in Overcoming Reproductive Difficulties

    Women Feel Positive About Egg Banking, Even Though Many Believe They Will Never Use The Eggs They Have Stored

    Why Women Donate Their Eggs In European Clinics

    Previous 5 Features ...

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
     
    Related Content
    Breastfeeding = Sagging Breasts? Not So, Concludes a Recent Study

    Protecting Babies from HIV Infection through Protein in Breast Milk

    Calcium Is Important For Nursing Mothers' Oral Health

    One Year of Breastfeeding Lowers Mom’s Risk of Diabetes

    Breastfeeding Doesn’t Increase Babies’ Intelligence

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2017 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.