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August 22, 2017  
COMMUNITY: Frequently Asked Questions
Uterus1: How can more doctors be trained to do minimally invasive surgery?
Dr. Hugo Ribot: We hope to be more involved in training once we have our own surgery center. The greatest advances in minimally invasive medicine have occurred not in academic settings but in private practice. That includes new instruments and laparoscopic techniques. Few physicians graduating from ob/gyn residency programs have adequate surgical training, especially laparoscopy. When we were recruiting a new physician last year, I don’t know how many resumes I sifted through to find a doctor with an interest and experience in laparoscopy. It took a year and a half to find someone. A lot of faculty members are only two to five years out of their residency. They aren’t particularly well trained in advanced techniques. The quality and availability of advanced surgical training in most programs is suboptimal. The American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists has certified several minimally invasive surgery fellowships but that doesn’t even come close to addressing the need to have enough doctors out in the community. So, we are going to try to develop relationships with the four residency training programs in the state of Georgia. When new doctors are doing their gynecological clerkship and learning surgery, hopefully they can do a rotation with us. Hands on is the only way. You can’t just go to a weekend course and learn to properly do these procedures on patients.
Dr. Hugo Ribot: We hope to be more involved in training once we have our own surgery center. The greatest advances in minimally invasive medicine have occurred not in academic settings but in private practice. That includes new instruments and laparoscopic techniques. Few physicians graduating from ob/gyn residency programs have adequate surgical training, especially laparoscopy. When we were recruiting a new physician last year, I don’t know how many resumes I sifted through to find a doctor with an interest and experience in laparoscopy. It took a year and a half to find someone. A lot of faculty members are only two to five years out of their residency. They aren’t particularly well trained in advanced techniques. The quality and availability of advanced surgical training in most programs is suboptimal. The American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists has certified several minimally invasive surgery fellowships but that doesn’t even come close to addressing the need to have enough doctors out in the community. So, we are going to try to develop relationships with the four residency training programs in the state of Georgia. When new doctors are doing their gynecological clerkship and learning surgery, hopefully they can do a rotation with us. Hands on is the only way. You can’t just go to a weekend course and learn to properly do these procedures on patients.

Dr. Hugo Ribot


Hugo D. Ribot Jr., MD, FACOG, is an obstetrician and gynecologist in Cartersville, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, he grew up in the Bahamas. After earning his bachelors degree from Dartmouth College, Dr. Ribot attended medical school at the University of Miami School of Medicine and completed his residency at Emory University. He was Emory’s first recipient of the annual American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists resident award in advanced laparoscopic gynecology. In his medical community, he was the first to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy, laparoscopic removal of ectopic pregnancy, and laparoscopic bladder suspension and pelvic floor reconstruction. Most recently, he was the first to perform the TVT procedure for minimally invasive treatment of urinary incontinence. In 2006 he became the first gynecologic surgeon in the state of Georgia to routinely perform outpatient total laparoscopic hysterectomy, which does not require an overnight stay in the hospital. Dr. Ribot also became the first surgeon in Georgia to demonstrate the feasibility of performing endometrial ablation for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding in an office setting, providing women with a non-lifestyle-disrupting alternative to hysterectomy. He is now involved in training other physicians in this procedure.

Dr. Ribot also has been active in his community, serving on the board of the local battered women’s shelter and the local chamber of commerce. He is also the Chairman of the Department of Ob/Gyn at Cartersville Medical Center.

Dr. Hugo Ribot


Hugo D. Ribot Jr., MD, FACOG, is an obstetrician and gynecologist in Cartersville, Georgia, a suburb of Atlanta. Born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, he grew up in the Bahamas. After earning his bachelors degree from Dartmouth College, Dr. Ribot attended medical school at the University of Miami School of Medicine and completed his residency at Emory University. He was Emory’s first recipient of the annual American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists resident award in advanced laparoscopic gynecology. In his medical community, he was the first to perform total laparoscopic hysterectomy, laparoscopic removal of ectopic pregnancy, and laparoscopic bladder suspension and pelvic floor reconstruction. Most recently, he was the first to perform the TVT procedure for minimally invasive treatment of urinary incontinence. In 2006 he became the first gynecologic surgeon in the state of Georgia to routinely perform outpatient total laparoscopic hysterectomy, which does not require an overnight stay in the hospital. Dr. Ribot also became the first surgeon in Georgia to demonstrate the feasibility of performing endometrial ablation for the treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding in an office setting, providing women with a non-lifestyle-disrupting alternative to hysterectomy. He is now involved in training other physicians in this procedure.

Dr. Ribot also has been active in his community, serving on the board of the local battered women’s shelter and the local chamber of commerce. He is also the Chairman of the Department of Ob/Gyn at Cartersville Medical Center.

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