Uterus1.com: Great Information, Real Community, Better Living.
 Register
 Login
 Main Page
 Uterus News
Feature Story
 Education Center

Conditions
Treatments
Diagnostics

Find a Physician
HTA in the News
 Heavy Periods Center
sharonbober  Uterus
 Hero™

Dr. Sharon Bober:
Healing the Sex Lives of Cancer Patients
About Heroes
 Join the Discussion in  Our Forums
 Community
Uterus1 Forums
Patient Stories
Frequently
    Asked Questions

One Question Poll
    Archive

 Reference
Locate a Specialist
Online Resources
Uterus Anatomy
Video Library
Menstrual Diary
Office Visits
Patient Brochures
  
advertisement
Search the Body1 Network
August 22, 2019  
UTERINE NEWS: Feature Story

  • Print this Article
  • Email this Article
  • Sleeping And Pregnancy

    Trouble Sleeping During Pregnancy Isn’t Inevitable


    October 15, 2007

    By: Beth Walsh for Uterus1

    Although many pregnant women have trouble sleeping, especially in the third trimester, problems getting good shut-eye aren’t a foregone conclusion. Getting enough sleep is important for pregnant women; studies have shown that women who got less than six hours of sleep a night for their last month of pregnancy had longer labors (29 hours versus 18 hours) and a greater risk of having a C-section, as compared to women who logged at least seven hours of sleep nightly.
    Take Action
  • Cut down on nighttime trips to the bathroom by drinking plenty of fluids during the day but limiting your intake in the hours before you go to bed.
  • Have a snack before bedtime to stave off nighttime hunger and nausea.
  • Make your bedroom a comfortable place to sleep.
  • Keep a consistent sleep schedule.
  • Use pillows to prop yourself on your side. A pillow between your legs to support the hips also can help.
  • If fear and anxiety about the birth and becoming a parent are keeping you up, consider a childbirth or parenting class.
  • Seventy-eight percent of women have insomnia and other sleep problems during pregnancy. Of course, the main reason for this is that a growing fetus causes a variety of discomforts – and other common physical symptoms may interfere with sleep as well.

    The kidneys of pregnant women work harder to filter the increased volume of blood, which is 30 to 50 percent more than before pregnancy. This filtering process results in more urine. Plus, the growing baby puts pressure on the bladder. Oftentimes, a fetus is more active at night which also adds to the amount of pressure on the bladder.

    Heart rate increases during pregnancy as well, in order to pump the increased volume of blood. As more of the blood supply goes to the uterus, the heart works harder to send enough blood to the rest of the body. As the enlarging uterus takes up more space, it puts pressure on the diaphragm. This can make pregnant women feel short of breath. The body’s oxygen needs increase so pregnant women tend to breathe faster and more deeply.

    The extra weight of pregnancy can cause leg cramps and backaches. A pregnant woman will probably be more sensitive to these discomforts when she tries to go to sleep, when the regular distractions of the day fall away. About a quarter of pregnant women will develop restless legs syndrome. This condition can be related to iron deficiency, which becomes increasingly common after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Women with the problem should have their iron levels checked.

    Many women also experience heartburn during pregnancy. Heartburn occurs when the stomach’s contents flow backwards up into the esophagus. During pregnancy, the entire digestive system slows down and food tends to remain in the stomach and intestines longer, which may cause heartburn or constipation.

    There are plenty of reasons for disturbed sleep during pregnancy but there are many steps you can take to address the challenges:

  • Cut down on nighttime trips to the bathroom by drinking plenty of fluids during the day but limiting your intake in the hours before you go to bed. Avoid coffee and tea late in the day. When you urinate, lean forward to help completely empty your bladder.
  • Have a snack before bedtime to stave off nighttime hunger and nausea.
  • Make your bedroom a comfortable place to sleep. Establish a bedtime routine, set a comfortable temperature and try to keep a consistent sleep schedule.
  • If you've always been a back or stomach sleeper, it may be difficult to get used to sleeping on your side as doctors recommend. Use pillows to prop yourself on your side. A pillow between your legs to support the hips also can help.
  • If fear and anxiety about the birth and becoming a parent are keeping you up, consider a childbirth or parenting class. More knowledge and the company of other pregnant women may help ease your fears.

    Last updated: 15-Oct-07

  • Comments

  • Add Comment
  •    
    Interact on Uterus1

    Discuss this topic with others.
     
    Feature Archives

    Breast Milk as Nutrition and Medication for Critically Ill Infants

    Study Finds New Moms Still Excessively Sleepy After Four Months

    Preterm Infants and Their Mothers Benefit from Maternal Singing During Skin-to-Skin Contact

    Stress Impacts Ability to Get Pregnant

    Link Discovered Between Bacteria and Premature Water Breaking

    Next 5 Features ...

    More Features ...
       
     
    Related Multimedia

    The Enteryx Procedure

     
    Related Content
    Knee Replacement 101 – Part Two

    Bengals’ Nick Williams Slated For Surgery

    Jordan Has Successful Knee Surgery

    Bears De-Activate Kreutz, Holdman

    Jets’ Wide Receiver Sidelined

    More Features ...
     
    Home About Us Press Jobs Advertise With Us Contact Us
    advertisement
    © 2019 Body1 All rights reserved.
    Disclaimer: The information provided within this website is for educational purposes only and is not a substitute for consultation with your physician or healthcare provider. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the Owners and Sponsors of this site. By using this site you agree to indemnify, and hold the Owners and Sponsors harmless, from any disputes arising from content posted here-in.